Does Scra Apply To Spouses Credit Cards?

Have you ever wondered if the Servicemembers Civil Relief Act (SCRA) applies to your spouse’s credit cards? As a military spouse, it’s important to understand your rights and protections under SCRA. This federal law offers a range of benefits to…

Have you ever wondered if the Servicemembers Civil Relief Act (SCRA) applies to your spouse’s credit cards? As a military spouse, it’s important to understand your rights and protections under SCRA. This federal law offers a range of benefits to military personnel and their families, including financial and legal protections.

In this article, we’ll dive into the details of SCRA and how it relates to spouses and their credit cards. We’ll explore the key provisions of the law, including interest rate caps and foreclosure protections, and discuss how they apply to credit cards in particular. Whether you’re a new military spouse or have been part of the military community for years, this information will help you make informed decisions about your finances and protect your family’s financial well-being.

Does Scra Apply to Spouses Credit Cards?

Does SCRA Apply to Spouses Credit Cards?

If you or your spouse are in the military, you may have heard of the Servicemembers Civil Relief Act (SCRA). This act provides a number of financial protections for active-duty service members, including interest rate reduction on debts incurred prior to entering active duty and protection from eviction. But what about credit cards held by spouses of service members? Does SCRA apply to them? Let’s take a closer look.

Overview of SCRA

The Servicemembers Civil Relief Act was passed in 2003 to provide financial protections to active-duty service members and their families. Some of the protections provided by the act include:


  • Interest rate reduction on debts incurred prior to entering active duty

  • Protection from eviction

  • Termination of certain contracts

  • Protection from default judgments in civil cases

  • Stay of proceedings in civil cases

The act applies to active-duty service members, reservists, and members of the National Guard who have been called to active duty for more than 30 days.

Does SCRA Apply to Spouses Credit Cards?

The short answer is no, SCRA does not apply to credit cards held by spouses of service members. The act only applies to debts incurred by the service member themselves prior to entering active duty. However, some credit card companies may offer their own benefits to military spouses, such as reduced interest rates or waived fees. It’s worth checking with your credit card company to see what benefits they may offer.

Benefits of SCRA

While SCRA may not apply to credit cards held by spouses, there are still many benefits to the act for service members and their families. Some of these benefits include:


  • Reduced interest rates on pre-service debts

  • Protection from eviction

  • Termination of certain contracts

  • Protection from default judgments in civil cases

  • Stay of proceedings in civil cases

These protections can help service members and their families stay financially stable while they are serving our country.

SCRA vs. MLA

It’s worth noting that there is another act that provides financial protections to service members and their families: the Military Lending Act (MLA). While SCRA focuses on debt and civil matters, MLA focuses on lending practices. Some of the protections provided by MLA include:


  • Cap on interest rates for certain types of loans

  • Prohibition on mandatory arbitration clauses

  • Prohibition on prepayment penalties

  • Clear disclosure of loan terms

MLA applies to all active-duty service members, including National Guard and Reserve members, and their dependents. If you are a service member or a military spouse and you are considering taking out a loan, it’s worth checking to see if the lender is compliant with MLA.

In Conclusion

While SCRA does not apply to credit cards held by spouses of service members, the act still provides many important financial protections for service members and their families. If you have questions about SCRA or MLA, it’s worth reaching out to your legal assistance office or a financial advisor who specializes in military financial issues.

Frequently Asked Questions

What is SCRA?

The Servicemembers Civil Relief Act (SCRA) is a federal law that provides military members with legal and financial protections while they are on active duty. The law limits or suspends certain civil obligations to allow military members to focus on their duties without legal distractions.

What protections does SCRA provide?

SCRA provides a wide range of protections for military members, including reduced interest rates on loans and credit cards, protection from eviction, and the ability to terminate housing and car leases. It also allows military members to delay civil court proceedings and provides certain tax protections.

Does SCRA apply to spouses?

Yes, SCRA protections apply to military members and their spouses. For example, if a military member’s spouse is listed as a joint account holder on a credit card, the account may be eligible for a reduced interest rate under SCRA. However, the protections do not apply to civilian spouses who are not listed on the account.

It is important to note that SCRA protections only apply to obligations that were incurred before the military member entered active duty. If the obligation was incurred after the member entered active duty, it may not be covered under SCRA.

Do I need to notify my credit card company that I am eligible for SCRA protections?

Yes, in order to receive the benefits of SCRA, you will need to provide your credit card company with a copy of your military orders. The credit card company will then be required to reduce your interest rate to 6% for the duration of your active duty service.

It is important to note that if you are not current on your credit card payments, you may not be eligible for SCRA protections. You should contact your credit card company as soon as possible if you are having trouble making payments.

Can my credit card company charge me fees while I am on active duty?

No, under SCRA, credit card companies are prohibited from charging certain fees to military members while they are on active duty. For example, they cannot charge a penalty fee for missing a payment, and they cannot charge an annual fee that exceeds $50.

Additionally, credit card companies are required to waive certain fees, such as balance transfer fees and cash advance fees, for military members who are on active duty.

What should I do if I believe my rights under SCRA have been violated?

If you believe your rights under SCRA have been violated, you should contact a military legal assistance attorney or your unit’s legal assistance officer. They can provide you with guidance on how to proceed and may be able to represent you in court if necessary.

You can also file a complaint with the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) or the Department of Justice (DOJ) if you believe a credit card company has violated your rights under SCRA.

The Servicemembers Civil Relief Act – Know Your Protections and Benefits!


In conclusion, the Servicemembers Civil Relief Act (SCRA) does apply to spouses’ credit cards under certain circumstances. If the spouse obtained the credit card while the servicemember was on active duty, or if the servicemember added the spouse as an authorized user to their credit card account while on active duty, then the SCRA can provide protection for the spouse’s credit card debt.

It’s important to note that the SCRA doesn’t automatically apply to spouses’ credit cards and the spouse needs to request the protection in writing. This request should be made to the credit card company and should include a copy of the servicemember’s active duty orders.

Overall, the SCRA provides important protections for servicemembers and their families, including their spouses’ credit card debt. If you or your spouse are a servicemember and have questions about the SCRA and its protections, it’s important to consult with a legal professional or a financial advisor to ensure that you understand your rights and obligations.

Similar Posts

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *